What should I know before an interview at NBCUniversal?

What should I know before an interview at NBCUniversal?
2018-06-26T17:23:08Z 4
2018-06-26T17:23:08Z

Former Global Media Operations Intern at NBCUniversal

about 2 years ago
For interviewing, the questions I was asked were fairly standard. My biggest tip would be to remain completely honest-- plenty of the interns had no prior industry experience (including myself), so be open about what you want to learn from the position.
2018-06-26T17:23:08Z

Former Partnership Marketing & Promotions Intern at NBCUniversal

about 2 years ago
Yes! The interview process to interview at NBCUniversal involves two or three interviews. First, the video interview, in which applicants must video record their interview answers from prompted answers through third party service. This preliminary interview asks questions that are generally tailored towards the internship role/department the applicant indicated they were interested in. It's fairly short, and definitely kinda weird to be able to see yourself answer, but it's not too bad! After the video interview will either be a phone interview, or an in-person interview. For any NBCU interview, and this is helpful in general, I'd recommend to think of any potential questions they may ask you, write those down on a document, and have answers for those questions. Even if they don't actually ask those questions, you'll be better prepared in what you may want to say, or how you can spin your answers to answer the actual questions. The main question that you absolutely have to perfect is when asked about your prior experience. Tailor your response to how that experience fits well with the position. I've found that most interviews don't really have tricky questions, though you should be prepared. It's always important to do research and due diligence for the role/department you're interviewing for. I know when I interviewed for an internship with Focus Features, they asked what Focus Features films I was looking forward to seeing in theaters--so always good to be prepared for anything! Also, if they ask for supplemental assignments if they're deciding between candidates, think creatively on what you decide to submit. For Focus Features, they notified me to submit a response of two film film marketing campaigns (one that I thought was effective and one that I thought wasn't). Instead of submitting a word doc, I created a keynote presentation (title page and everything) that had my two picks along with image pulls and video example of those campaigns. So thinking creatively always works out really well, in my opinion and experience.
2018-06-26T17:23:08Z

Former Marketing/Sales Intern at NBCUniversal

about 2 years ago
Be yourself, research the company objectives and what non-profits they sponsor, know about your department in depth, dress to impress!
2018-06-26T17:23:08Z

Former Principal Dancer at NBCUniversal

about 2 years ago
Headshots, Resumes and Agents. If you're working on a budget find a talented photographer looking for experience to create a well shot 8x10 color print to start. J&B Photo in Chicago to this day does all of my reprints and are awesome with performers and cheap. You shouldn’t pay more than 300-500 for headshots - I had mine done by Michael Helm in LA who shoots soap stars and didn’t pay more than 350$.Unless you plan to work behind a desk at NBC you need an agent (not necessarily a manager). Agents will take 10% and a manager 15-20% of your income. Make sure to request that they take their fee from ‘off the top’ so that you as a performer can receive all contractual payments. Don’t sign with a new agent for more than 6 months unless you are smitten. Negotiate what they will represent you for and negotiate royalties - that is, do you want an agent to rep you for theatre only and have a manager for film, and television and another for Print and modeling, or do you want one who can do it all? As quick and as flashy as they may come off agents do not know everything. A good agent can do much with little. Acting for the Camera Classes, experience as an actor in school is awesome, but stage to screen is much different. Acting for the camera classes teaches you the kind of etiquette directors and producers will assume you know before hand. David and Linda Laundra (NY, LA, Chicago) are two excellent and not expensive Acting for the Camera Teachers. Also remember a rejection doesn’t mean "no" or "you’re not good enough" but rather there's something else you can do that's not the match for this role. When you audition and have presented yourself well they will remember you and even if it's ten auditions down the line - you book the eleventh production simply because they always liked you and were looking for the right vehicle to place you in. Don’t give up but instead see every opportunity as the next opportunity.
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