Did you receive a return offer after your internship at Hewlett Packard?

Did you receive a return offer after your internship at Hewlett Packard?
2018-07-10T17:12:51Z 2
2018-07-10T17:12:51Z

Former MIS and Financial Intern at Hewlett-Packard

about 2 years ago
Yes, You can potentially turn your internship into a full time offer. Just be pro active, and try to deliver a little more than required, how you do that is up to you. You just need to show that you care about the work and the company, even if you can't deliver more than the required work, if they see your potential, and your will to at least Try, they will offer you a job. At the end of the internship, they usually give away small gifts such as a laptop, etc. Which is their way of showing their interest in you. The final advise I can give you is that, Never explicitly say No to your boss, tell them something like, "Let me look into it, I'll figure it out" etc. You should be the person who should come into your boss's mind when he has a problem, so be a problem solver, instead of a problem creator.
2018-07-10T17:12:51Z

Former Product Manager at HP Co.

about 2 years ago
I’m not sure whether your internship is just a summer job, or a trial- phase start at full-time permanent. And I’m not sure whether you’re a Caltech undergrad or Master’s student, or just graduated. But it seems a little unlikely that if you’re any of those, you would have had much training and/or experience in marketing (see 1.a.-h. above). So the more of that you can get, the better for an on-going or future PME job at HP, unless they really plan to train you in that absolutely from scratch, which would of course be a bit biased. So learning more about marketing from books, in-person and on-line classes, etc. would help. Also, as what I’m guessing is a relative marketing neophyte, please don’t take a common modern view of “marketing” as what I call marketing promotional efforts. Product/services promotion is only a part of marketing, in spite of the views of the modern “social media is everything” set. Please also don’t take the limited view of many people today who have decided that marketing = sales = advertising = lying. If you have business customers buying into your company’s products, services, and programs, you are creating and maintaining long-term relationships with them, and telling over-statements and falsehoods about the products to the customers can destroy those relationships quickly. The entire basis of business is trust. Obviously try to do what they ask you to while you’re there, and understand how your efforts fit in with that product line’s efforts. Be friendly with and have discussions with other PMEs and product managers, plus product support and product development engineers there about what’s going on in that group and others, and ask what the climate might be for transitioning to full-time permanent. Also, toward the end of your internship, ask the relevant manager(s) to transition you to a full-time position if you want that. Having discussions with them will tell you their views of whether that’s appropriate in the near future. If they “can’t” (won’t) do it, don’t worry too much that it may be YOUR fault. It may be that they’ve just confirmed yet another downturn in business (sales volume), and are starting to worry about having to CUT their own staff. Or it may be because they “can’t get permanent outside headcount,” i.e. have no authorization for hiring more people who are not already permanent HP employees. This is a frequent scenario (or at least excuse), and means that your internship was mostly a public relations & college good will exercise, which are authorized and funded at the top levels of the company totally independent of and long before anyone sees trouble on the horizon in a specific product line, or the economy in general. That’s OK -- HP has MANY other divisions, groups, and managers who may be able and happy to hire you full time. So seek them out. Obviously, doing your internship job well and getting a good recommendation from that manager or maybe related managers will facilitate your possible efforts with other divisions and groups.
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