What does a typical day look like working for Amazon Fulfillment?

What does a typical day look like working for Amazon Fulfillment?
2018-08-05T19:57:51Z 3
2018-08-05T19:57:51Z

Former Warehouse Associate at Amazon Fulfillment

over 1 year ago
I worked at the Lenexa, KS warehouse in the summer of 2017, so if you work in another facility your experiences might be different. My shifts were 4 hours long, five days per week. I was able to set my own schedule, but there are many opportunities to pick up extra shifts if you need to work more. Before work I made a lunch, usually 2 PB+J sandwiches. Drove to the warehouse (parking can sometimes be a mess, so getting there early can be nice). Drop off my food in the break room, then start my shift. There are a few different tasks that you can be assigned to do. You get your task at the beginning of each shift. If management notices that people need to change roles mid-shift, they will adjust people accordingly. The task that most people perform is package scanning and placing them onto pallets. Packages come down via a large conveyer belt, and there are roughly 50 pallets on each side of the belt. You take a package from the belt, look at the sticker on it (which tells you which pallet it needs to go on), and then scan the package with your handheld scanner. You must stack the box on top of the other boxes that are already on the pallet, which can be hard. It's a fun exercise in tetris. Each pallet will be stacked up to roughly 6ft tall before it is replaced by a new pallet. Stacking the boxes well is an essential part of the job, and adds a degree of adapting and learning and optimization in an otherwise bland job. You will be working this conveyer belt with 10-40 other people, so avoiding collisions with others is also important. Proficient workers can process 180+ packages per hour. Dealing with other people stacking boxes improperly is probably the most frustrating aspect of this job. Some people are sent to do 'outbound'. This means taking the pallets that are full of packages, wrapping them in cling wrap to stabilize them, and loading them onto trucks so that they can be taken to post offices or other warehouses. Some people are sent to do 'inbound'. This is taking boxes out of trucks and putting them onto the conveyer belt so that the others may later sort them onto the correct pallet. This was my favorite position, as it was more physically demanding and faster paced than regular scanning and stacking. There are a few other tasks, but those are the main ones. Regardless of task, break time was usually called 2-3 hours into the shift. 15 minutes of break, then back to work to finish the shift.
2018-08-05T19:57:51Z

Sortation Associate at Amazon

over 1 year ago
Its hard work. Its not easy. You are constantly moving. Pick up heavy boxes and light boxes. You are going to get a workout with this job. You come in, wait in the lobby for your shift to start, clock in, and wait for you line leaders and managers. They have you start out in a circle and do a couple of stretches and provide the daily motivation for you to work. There are breaks in between shifts as well as a lunch break.
2018-08-05T19:57:51Z

Former Seasonal Fulfillment Associate at Amazon Fulfillment Center

over 1 year ago
Depending on what building you are in, you’ll either be working full or part time. My job is part time, but you are on your feet and moving all throughout your shift. This is a manual labor job so try not to be surprised when they ask you to lift things. Part of the job description is to be able to lift 50 pounds. Working part time was actually very nice, it allows you to work a second job but it also allows you to have adequate time off throughout the day since you never work for more than 5 hours at a time.
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