How do I get a product management internship?

How do I get a product management internship?
2018-03-22T15:47:05Z 5
2018-03-22T15:47:05Z

Product Manager - Particle System Characterization at METTLER TOLEDO Autochem

7 months ago
The path to product management isn't always direct. One thing you can do is look for an internship at any company where you would want to break into product management and try to move into a product specialist, associate product manager, or junior program manager role. Start building customer facing experience and work on building up the skillset with input from the company.
2018-03-22T15:47:05Z

Product Manager at Adero

10 months ago
In my opinion, it really starts by first answering the question: 'why' do you want to get into Product Management? In essence, Product Management is really about understanding the pains and the gains a customer goes through and translating that into product features and functionalities. It's really about getting answers to the 'What' and 'Why' rather than 'How' to build a particular product. An internship is a good way to get your foot in the door because almost all full time PM roles ask for prior PM experience. Associate PM role is the other alternative and several good companies like Twitter and Uber have a rotational program to groom APMs. To be prepared to apply for PM Internships, definitely have some prior projects/work ex to talk about customer facing aspects of work that you have performed in the past to make your case stronger. Having some experience of working with not just technical teams, but other customer facing teams such as sales, marketing, business development is certainly valuable. Besides applying on job portals like Handshake, LinkedIn, Indeed, Angel List, definitely look up start-ups and other companies that you are passionate to work with and look up key people in the product teams in those companies. Then see if you have any mutual connections to get an introduction. Alternatively, look up their LinkedIn profile and reach out to them by expressing your interest for their work and pitch yourself to land up a 15 minute call or a short meeting over coffee. This definitely will earn you a place in their contact and expand your network for future opportunities.
2018-03-22T15:47:05Z

Former Product Management Intern Intuit

about 2 years ago
My advice to non-majors would be that PMs often times don't do technical work themselves, but they must empathize with their team in order to earn their respect and credibility. Therefore they are jack of all trades, spanning design, engineering, data science, and sales & business strategy, but are not necessarily masters of any one of them. The most important traits of PMs are customer-obsession, thinking long term, and constantly evaluating hypotheses of user needs with product-related experiments. These skills are best acquired by doing side projects which has potential to positively impact real users. If you're an English major, partner up with a technical co-founder and take charge of sales, marketing, and design strategy. You'll be able to talk about product decisions when you later go on to interview at top tech companies.
2018-03-22T15:47:05Z

Former Engineering Product Management Intern at Apple

about 2 years ago
My response is that while technical knowledge is important (and you should work to develop a solid foundation about things such as system architecture and design patterns, frameworks vs. libraries, and maybe develop some proficiency in a programming language like Python, Java, or Javascript), process is key. The strongest employees are the ones who have a process to fall back on. Work to understand the process behind Design Thinking. Learn about what it means to empathize with users, practice making mockups, and practice defining how things are currently done, identifying pain points, and brainstorming solutions for those pain points. When you can walk through an identified process, you can help lead a team through this exercise. Also work to understand the software development cycle. Learn about Agile vs. Waterfall vs. Spiral and what makes all of them good to use and not good to use. Learn about the challenges people face in each development method. If you're interviewing for PM positions, it might be good to ask about which the company uses and how their own flavors get mixed into the process. The last piece of advice that I have is to work to be really good at listening, synthesizing, and communicating. Being a PM means listening to your clients, your developers, your marketing team, and synthesizing all of this information to be coherent, and then communicating it to the other groups in a clear and concise way. Many CEO's look for top-level communicators above all else. Communication is KEY. I find that non-technical fields prepare students for communication better than in technical fields, so this is an area where you may have a leg up on the competition! PM positions are really tough to come by for new grads. Never give up. Consider starting in a technical writing position and working your way up. Most of the prominent PM jobs are associate/junior level positions that are given to top graduates in design, computer science, and human-computer interaction. Keep working on these skills and eventually you're sure to get an opportunity that fits your skill set. I'd highly recommend the book "Cracking the PM Interview" as a lot of these skills are gone over in more depth.
2018-03-22T15:47:05Z

Former Product Manager Intern at Groupon

about 2 years ago
I think product management extends far beyond the "technical" side of things (although picking up a programming language, learning basic data structures, algorithms, and system design, and reviewing key databasing procedures would not hurt). A non-technical major would flourish in understanding user empathy and delivering a product that is not only technically feasible but also psychologically needed by the end user. This quick article (something I reference weekly to ground myself) is a perfect starting place for a new PM, https://a16z.com/2012/06/15/good-product-managerbad-product-manager/. Coupling a deep interest to learn about (and scout out) emerging tech trends and a strong passion to own one's product (be it an app, a service, a pipeline, an organization, etc.) would be easiest way to flourish as a new PM. Hope that helps!
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