How do I break into journalism?

How do I break into journalism?
2018-03-22T15:28:02Z 6
2018-03-22T15:28:02Z

Former Administrative assistant at Public Narrative

7 months ago
I'm looking for writing and editing jobs, but I'm also writing and editing my own blog, Margaret Serious. I'm writing about writing (and languages, books and related topics), but you can write about whatever you'd like to break into. Prove that you can do it for fun, and you'll have fun even before you're paid for it. Also, you'll build up the portfolio that proves it.
2018-03-22T15:28:02Z

Senior, Journalism

10 months ago
Start small. It can be tempting to want to aim for bylines in large publications right off the bat, but this is often tough. Journalists often start at the grassroots level. Write for your university's newspaper, and become an active member of journalism organizations, such as the Society for Professional Journalists. Peruse websites for opportunities to publish your writing, and work actively to add work samples to your portfolio. Polish your online presence as well, and use websites like LinkedIn to establish connections with pre-established journalists and reporters. Leverage your university's resources to reach out to alumni with connections in the field, and apply for internships too. One thing will lead to another, and with determination and passion, you'll be able to establish yourself well.
2018-03-22T15:28:02Z

Freelancer at Pensacola News Journal

about 1 year ago
Join the newspaper staff on campus! I couldn't believe how many journalism majors were not on The Corsair (PSC's student newspaper). When I applied to freelance for the PNJ, the editor looked at my clips before she called me in for a chat (it was very informal). At least half the entries on my portfolio were from the student newspaper. You can start a portfolio (up to ten FREE entries) on this website: https://www.journoportfolio.com/. 
Remember that a resume tells a future employer what you can do, but a portfolio shows them.
2018-03-22T15:28:02Z

Former Student Employment Coordinator at Washington State University

over 1 year ago
Create quality content as often as you can. Try to get your work published and out there so you have examples to reference in applications. The school newspaper can still show your writing abilities, and demonstrates your ability to respond to a timeline. I've applied to some journalism jobs recently (I currently work in a different field) and without any current writing samples, I know I wasn't as strong of a candidate as others who had current content out and accessible.
2018-03-22T15:28:02Z

Director of Marketing Communications, Moore Colson CPAs and Advisors

over 2 years ago
I think the best advice is to start early! Do not wait until your senior year to apply and participate in an internship. Start earlier if you can. While some internships are paid and others are not, try to do either in order to obtain experience. It will greatly enhance your search for a full time job going forward. In addition to UGA internship programs, promote yourself to companies in your area. Keep the communication going and reach out to organizations that you admire and also industry associations. Prior to interviewing for an internship, prepare mock releases, blogs, articles, white papers, and leadership promotional materials, etc. Do as much as you can to illustrate your command of PR and related areas. Upon beginning an internship, commit to the employer that you want to learn and do as much as you can to gain experience in all areas of PR and Marketing. In today’s world, one must wear many hats. You may be asked to write website, collateral and ad content too. You will most certainly be involved in all types of social media, so prepare as best you can for everything that might come your way.
2018-03-22T15:28:02Z

Editorial Intern, The New Potato

over 2 years ago
My advice on how to get a journalism internship is to be well-versed with how news outlets operate, the different types of news available to the consumer (i.e. print vs. digital), the social media platforms news runs on, as well as knowing how to write material through a journalistic lens (i.e. how to write a compelling news story, including key components, and know how to edit/revise well). Last summer I interned for "The New Potato" (TheNewPotato.com) which was a news publication that's content revolved around the world through the lens of food. The publication posts a lot of lifestyle/health/wellness/food content and I was the editorial intern. I was responsible for researching restaurant and bar trends in Manhattan and Brooklyn and created five 20-30 item listicles per day. The publication also posts content about fashion and celebrities. I was also responsible for coding the HTML links for these different listicles into the back-end of the website on which the publication operated on. My other duties included grabbing and editing images on Photoshop and Preview. The pros of a media internship is that you can learn a lot about how to target a specific demographic and audience, and see how a publication runs its day-to-day content and why the publication might choose to post a specific article one day over a different day (this obviously would apply more to publications that are not covering hard news). The cons of a media internship are that you do not always get to see the financial and business side of the company. That is not always the case, but it probably is more likely than not. Another con of some media internships is that they are usually unpaid.
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