Tips for figuring out what to do with a marketing/communications degree?

Tips for figuring out what to do with a marketing/communications degree?
2018-03-21T22:03:08Z 11
2018-03-21T22:03:08Z

Alumni, Communication (MA) Combined

9 months ago
Literally nothing. It’s been two years and I can’t get hired anywhere. I have a masters and it’s gotten me nowhere. The people who get jobs with this degree probably live in a busy city with lots of connections. It’s not a real degree and no one respects you.
2018-03-21T22:03:08Z

Former Volulnteer Intern at Fort Larned National Historic Site

11 months ago
Go to USAJOBS.GOV they have a variety of resources if working for the federal government interests you.
2018-03-21T22:03:08Z

Product Manager at Hilti North America

about 1 year ago
The marketing umbrella is quite large and encompasses a lot of different career paths. I have an undergrad in marketing & sales which led me to the sales route for the first 6 years of my career or so. I am now in our marketing department working in product management.
You need to figure out what really excites you long-term and pick a career path that leads you to that destination job.
For me, customer interactions has been a core strength of mine along with passion for my customers and building a strategy to win that business. My end goal is geared towards managing a marketing function in either product or sales enablement to work with customers and build the strategy for a company to deliver that message. This end goal combines a lot of my core strengths and things that excite me.
So my suggestion would be to find out what excites you in business, how your core strengths match that, and how it can lead you to an end goal. But as long as you have that foundation, you can start to define your career path, but from personal experience that end goal may change!
2018-03-21T22:03:08Z

Former Customer Planning Specialist at Tyson Foods, Inc.

over 1 year ago
You may want to check this website. You search your degree and it lists possible positons for you. It also reports statistics of how many positions are open for that role, state and federal level. It also gives you links to apply .... good luck in your search 💗
https://www.onetonline.org
2018-03-21T22:03:08Z

Former student at Microsoft

over 1 year ago
Rebranding your image can be a task within itself. Once, you realize that we communicate throughout systems, organizations, and stake holders. Your communication degree becomes gold.
2018-03-21T22:03:08Z

Former Administrative Assistant College of Industrial Engineering at University Of Arkansas

over 1 year ago
I think it depends on the course content in your Communications degree program. For marketing knowledge of excel and the ability to interpret data from your audience or product is essential. As long as you are recieving course work that applies these skills you are good to go. Minors in Business Analytics or Behavior Studies could be helpful.
2018-03-21T22:03:08Z

University of Michigan '18, Communication

over 2 years ago
There are a lot of career paths open to communications majors! A few that seem to be the most popular are: marketing, public relations, advertising, journalism, and corporate communications. It is important to get real-world internship/volunteer experience with whichever career path you are most interested in, as employers see communications as a very broad major and want to see that you are passionate about a specific area.
2018-03-21T22:03:08Z

Arizona State University '19, Communication

over 2 years ago
I think that Communication majors have a lot of options when it comes to career paths. For myself, I've been looking into fields such as HR, marketing, and public relations. I feel as though the only fields that aren't open to Communication majors are those such as engineering and medical, and that is only because you need specific skills that only engineering and pre-med/medical school majors will offer for their related fields. Just remember, if there's a will, there's a way!
2018-03-21T22:03:08Z

Chapman University '18, Communication Studies

over 2 years ago
The different career paths open to communication majors are vast. I initially decided on the major when I was going to community college a few years ago, I had many interests, but was completely unsure if there were any subjects that I wanted to pursue a degree in. Communication combines aspects from business, psychology, sociology, and more. Because of this, one can essentially get a career in any of these fields. You study everything from giving presentations, team-building, research methods, intercultural studies, media, and much, much more. I personally started my communication degree with the intention of working in the entertainment career. However, I got a little older, travelled a little more, transferred colleges, and decided that I would rather pursue a career in humanitarian work and international development. This is one of the only degrees that I can think of where I could make this vast of a jump in careers but didn't have to change my major. As far as popular careers for comm majors go, many of my classmates are pursuing PR and social media management for a variety of businesses.
2018-03-21T22:03:08Z

Former Student Employment Coordinator at Washington State University

over 1 year ago
I have a degree in PR, and have found that communication degrees apply to almost ANYTHING. In some way or another, every job is looking for strong communication skills or a way to better communicate with their audiences. I had some experience in journalism, and I chose the major because it seemed universal. I currently work in higher education, while not necessarily public relations, I know my communication and marketing skills helped secure my position.
2018-03-21T22:03:08Z

Network Administrator at Western Michigan University

over 1 year ago
The beauty of a Communication degree is it's dexterity and adaptability with many different career paths. PR/social media, business, HR, and counseling are fairly common paths that my fellow undergrads perused. My best advice is find what talents, skills, and professional abilities you already have, then decide on how to fit communication skills (organization, time management, transparency, professional/technical writing) and you'd be surprised how many opportunities exist out there. I discovered that a combination of technology and management were both my passions, as well as skills I already honed while taking various communication classes. I was able to move up the ranks from technician, to manager of a small business, and up to network administration for my university. Good luck!
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